Professors Host Impeachment Panel ACE Event

Professors from a wide range of disciplines came together to educate students on the process of impeachment.

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Professors Host Impeachment Panel ACE Event

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On Wednesday, October 16th, Culver-Stockton College professors sat down with students and staff in Meaders Lounge to help clarify the often confusing place and history of the process of impeachment in American politics.  The panel drew a crowd that nearly filled the venue, with cameras and reporters from local news media dotting the space around the seating for students and faculty.

I think all of [the panel members] believe firmly that the only way participatory democracy works is by participation. We want to first inform students well about what this process is, and secondly we want to encourage them to engage, and to follow it, and to vote, and participate.”

— Dr. Patrick Hotle

 

 

The panel consisted of:  Dr. Patrick Hotle, Professor of History, Dr. Andy Walsh, Professor of Religion/Philosophy, Dr. Scott Giltner, Professor of History, Melody Schroer, JD, Associate Professor of Legal Studies, and Chad DeWaard, Assistant Professor of Political Science.

Each panelist began with an opening statement, combining the panelist’s expertise to create a comprehensive view of the topic.   After discussion of the basic structure of impeachment and historical background of the particulars of the impeachment process, Dr. Hotle moderated a Q&A session.   Hotle said that “… students had lots of really good, well-informed questions about this.”

He stated that the panelists were inspired to engage and inform the study body. “I think all of us believe firmly that the only way participatory democracy works is by participation. We want to first inform students well about what this process is, and secondly we want to encourage them to engage, and to follow it, and to vote, and participate. Really, I think we would all see this as our obligations as serious, responsible citizens to try to encourage as many people to engage with interesting issues as possible.”

Naomi Mosley, a junior with a major in business administration and political science, and Kenna Armstrong, a sophomore with a major in history education shared their perspectives.